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The Well Elderly and Aging

The emergence of a population group identified as the well elderly is the result of social and demographic progress in the industrial world. More elderly people are living longer and poverty, frailty, and dependence are not necessarily the com­mon characteristics attributed to most old people.

The future portends a healthier well elderly population who are better educated and physically as well as emotionally prepared. Society has, at present, begun utilizing their capabilities for the foreseeable future, thus guaranteeing a potentially rich human resource.

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DEPRESSION: The Signs and Aging

We often mistake an old person’s quiet withdrawal and lack of complaint as philosophic acceptance when, in fact, she is putting her best possible face on a bitterly disappointing, humiliating or frightening situation.

Either assumption, that it is normal to be unhappy or that old people are somehow happy about being unhappy, obstructs our view of the person’s true state of mind. Signs of distress deserve attention in old age as much as at any point in the lifespan.

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Successful Litigation Impacting Future Medicaid Payments

Stotler Hayes Group Attorney, Nathan Peters, presented at the Texas Healthcare Association’s Board of Directors meeting on August 21st, 2019. Nathan shared two updates on how Stotler Hayes Group’s (SHG) Texas-based attorneys are successfully fighting to recover every Medicaid dollar available for our clients, and all Texas providers. SHG attorneys have litigated two major issues with the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (THHSC) and both could significantly impact future Medicaid payments in Texas. The issues the cases have dealt with include (1) the THHSC’s denial of an application for failing to exclude inaccessible resources for incapacitated Medicaid Applicants and (2) THHSC’s improper restrictions on Incurred Medical Expenses (IME). By some estimates, the IME payments could alone boost Medicaid provider payments over $40 million annually.

Unlike some state Medicaid agencies, THHSC previously refusing to exclude certain resources when reviewing Medicaid applications for incapacitated individuals. This policy is leading to a significant loss in payments for providers, because affected providers are left without a payor source until the incapacitated resident can secure a guardian with the authority to spend down their resources. Unfortunately for these providers, securing a guardian and spending down resources for incapacitated individuals is often a lengthy and complicated process. However, SHG’s recent victory in the case of Tex. HHS Comm’n v. Marroney, 2019 Tex. App. LEXIS 4298, 2019 WL 2237885 (Tex. App. – Austin May 24, 2019, Pet. Denied) should lead the THHSC to change its policy and start excluding inaccessible resources for incapacitated residents.

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QUALITY OF LIFE AND AGING

In almost every book or article on aging, one idea continues to be stressed: longevity is desirable if accompanied by a life of high quality. But, I continue to ask, what makes for such a good life? Most of us want love, meaningful work, safety and security, energy and health, and to varying degrees, power, fame, freedom and wealth, and we want to live in a society that supports these goals.

How can we measure quality of life? There is no simple answer. It is an amorphous concept, constantly changing with the historical period and one’s culture, personal background, stage of life, and socioeconomic status. A person’s definition of quality of life is and should be highly individualized and objective.

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CMS Proposes One-Year Delay for Certain Phase 3 Skilled Nursing Requirements

Changes Made to Compliance and Ethics Programs and Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement Programs

On July 16, 2019, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) released a pre-publication copy of the revisions (“Proposed Rule”) to Part 483 to Title 42 of the Code of Federal Regulations the Requirements for States and Long-Term Care Facilities (“RoPs”). CMS stated that it identified a number of existing skilled nursing facility requirements that could reduce unnecessary burdens on facilities if they were simplified or eliminated.

The Proposed Rule would alter a over dozen sections of the RoPs, including: (1) resident rights; (2) admissions transfers and discharges; (3) quality of care; (4) nursing services; (5) behavioral health; (6) pharmacy services; (7) food and nutrition services; (8) facility assessments; (9) physical environment; (10) compliance and ethics programs; (11) Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement (“QAPI”) programs; and (12) infection control. The Proposed Rule also proposes to delay implementation to some of these Phase 3 provisions until one year following the effective date of the Proposed Rule.

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